2021 Dodge Challenger ACR Price and Review

2021 Dodge Challenger ACR Price and Review

2021 Dodge Challenger ACR Price and Review – Rumors of water coolers in the automotive world seem to suggest that the next special edition Dodge Challenger will resurrect the ACR nameplate first made popular on the Agile Neon and last seen on the Viper supercar. Keen to imagine what a handling-focused Mopar two-door coupe might look like, we turned to InsideEV’s featured render artist Andrei Nedelea for visual inspiration. Of course, these are just guesses on our part and nothing has been officially confirmed by Dodge, but that won’t stop us from dreaming about our dream Road Challenger.

2021 Dodge Challenger ACR Price and Review

ACR, which informally stands for “American club racer,” is a trim level reserved for track-ready versions of Dodge sports cars. In keeping with this mission, the Challenger ACR would likely wear carbon fiber or aluminum bodywork in key areas such as the front clip and trunk, improving weight distribution and handling and reducing the fat coupe’s pounds. The key to any modern ACR build is improved aerodynamics, and this Challenger version comes with an aggressive, removable front splitter and Viper-inspired rear spoiler. Our artist also simulated a version with a smaller rear spoiler inspired by the driver of the 1970 Dodge Challenger Trans-Am.

We’re betting the ACR will be standard in the Challenger’s “widebody” configuration, with meaty 305-millimeter-wide tires and adaptive suspension. We would also expect lightweight wheels and bigger brakes to make an appearance on the ACR, which will likely be powered by the R / T Scat Pack’s 6.4-liter Hemi V8 with 485 horsepower (362 kilowatts) and 475 lb-ft (644 Newton). . -meters). Such a powertrain would allow individuals to integrate their Challenger ACRs into many racing series banning forced induction and supercharging.

That said, an ACR with the Hellcat Redeye’s 797 hp (594 kW) 6.2-liter supercharged V8 would be a compelling fuel-efficient alternative to the Shelby GT500 Mustang, allowing the unboosted ACR to follow the GT350 and Chevy Camaro. ZL1 1LE.

Like the Neons and Vipers that came before it, we expect the 2021 Challenger ACR to feature a distinctly decent interior to keep weight down as well. A rear seat removal may be a standard option or a credit option, while manual air conditioning, removal of the stereo, and reduced insulation could still lead to weight loss. Expect a Challenger ACR to tip the scales at under 4,000 pounds with the base engine, dropping to around 4,100 pounds with the supercharged V8.

If the Challenger ACR is indeed in Dodge’s product plans, we expect them to make an announcement before the end of summer. You can bet we have our fingers crossed.

Dodge’s ACR nameplate began on the Viper in 1999 and was only granted to one other vehicle, the Neon compact sedan. ACR stands for American Cup Racer, and it’s a trim level that represents Dodge’s best track performance. It’s been three years since the Viper was discontinued, but a report from Allpar says that is about to change with the 2021 Dodge Challenger ACR.

According to a longtime source on the website, a slew of upgrades are in store for the LX Challenger platform to shed the muscle car label in search of pure performance. These include the reworked aero, tires, brakes, suspension and more. All of these modifications aim to transform the rather portly two-door – the Challenger Hellcat weighs over 4,400 pounds – into a weapon of less than two tons on the track.

Dodge plans to use some existing components to achieve this, as money is limited due to current global circumstances. These include the rear wing of the Viper ACR-E, a modified version of the splitter from that same car, and possibly other adjustable suspension components from the Viper, such as shocks. Nothing is said about the transmission in Allpar’s report, so the Challenger ACR may have to settle for the six-speed manual transmission offered on the Challenger Hellcat.

There would be two engine choices, the 6.2-liter supercharged V8 from the 797-horsepower Challenger Hellcat and the brand’s 392ci Hemi which produces 485 atmospheric horsepower. The brakes, presumably from Brembo, will have to work hard to stop the cars’ huge strap-on, even after they’ve been lightened.

Dodge hopes that all of this will help keep the new Challenger ACR within two seconds of its predecessor Viper on a track. They also want to demolish Ford’s new GT500 Mustang, which is hard to beat with its 760-horsepower V8, dual-clutch transmission and aggressive aerodynamics.

There is no information regarding the car’s release date, but with the development of the next-gen Challenger delayed due to the global recession, Dodge has some time to get the muscle car back in shape. For my part, I would love to know the secrets of the FCA diet if they can really lose nearly five hundred pounds from the Frozen Belly Challenger.

According to a longtime source on the website, a slew of upgrades are in store for the LX Challenger platform to shed the muscle car label in search of pure performance. These include the reworked aero, tires, brakes, suspension and more. All of these modifications aim to transform the rather portly two-door – the Challenger Hellcat weighs over 4,400 pounds – into a weapon of less than two tons on the track.

Dodge plans to use some existing components to achieve this, as money is limited due to current global circumstances. These include the rear wing of the Viper ACR-E, a modified version of the splitter from that same car, and possibly other adjustable suspension components from the Viper, such as shocks. Nothing is said about the transmission in Allpar’s report, so the Challenger ACR may have to settle for the six-speed manual transmission offered on the Challenger Hellcat.

There would be two engine choices, the 6.2-liter supercharged V8 from the 797-horsepower Challenger Hellcat and the brand’s 392ci Hemi which produces 485 atmospheric horsepower. The brakes, presumably from Brembo, will have to work hard to stop the cars’ huge strap-on, even after they’ve been lightened.

Dodge hopes that all of this will help keep the new Challenger ACR within two seconds of its predecessor Viper on a track. They also want to demolish Ford’s new GT500 Mustang, which is hard to beat with its 760-horsepower V8, dual-clutch transmission and aggressive aerodynamics.

There is no information regarding the car’s release date, but with the development of the next-gen Challenger delayed due to the global recession, Dodge has some time to get the muscle car back in shape. For my part, I would love to know the secrets of the FCA diet if they can really lose nearly five hundred pounds from the Frozen Belly Challenger.